By the fire (Anthology: “Places where I enjoy reading”)

By the fire (Anthology: “Places where I enjoy reading”)

Thought it would be a one-off, didn’t you? You’d just write that silly post about the toilet and then forget all about it. Face it. These type of posts are way more difficult than your usual book reviews, aren’t they? These posts are somewhat personal. Well! I’m giving it another shot! Here is part deux of my anthology aptly titled “Places where I enjoy reading”. To kickoff this entry let’s begin with the following description:

It is winter and there is a house by the mountain side. The house is empty and the summer days when it was filled with people are long gone. Now it is only visited during the weekends if rain or cold allow it. In that house there is a fireplace. It is surrounded by a rocking chair, a two-seat couch, an armchair and a table with four radios, two of which do not work. On the ground there is a woven basket filled with old logs of pine and evergreen trees at the bottom and thinner branches on top that are used to feed the fire once the kindling takes a spark.

The fire starts. Smoke  appears. Wood begins crackling. The room is still unbearably cold when one moves away from the hearth. A blanket and a cup of tea help to ward off the cold. 

(Editorial note: you actually stopped and made a cup of earl grey tea after you wrote this. I sincerely hope that you are not as much a procrastinator as I am future-me)

One of the four radios is on. It is an old SANYO, 2 Band receiver RP 6160 A, and it is currently set to FM. The National Classical Music Station is somewhere around the 100 Mhz mark as indicated by an orange bar that is operated by a small wheel on the side of the radio.

My grandmother used to listened to it every night. 

The thinner branches are already in the fireplace and I’ve placed a big log on top that I hope lasts the rest of the night. I sit back. The announcer on the radio let’s me know that the piece of music that I’ve been listening to for the past few minutes is Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis.

My eyes begin to close. Will there be embers in the morning hidden in the ash?

*

Outside of an exercise in describing one of my favorite places to sit down and read, I hope I’ve achieved an additional thing that explains why I love reading by the fireplace: it’s all about the mood.

Unlike the worryingly specific criteria that I have for a toilet book, the following are just a small -but excellent- selection of books to help me illustrate this “mood” theory and that go extremely well with a dark cold room, a small reading light and a roaring fire.

H.P. Lovecraft – Necronomicon & Eldritch Tales

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These are the only two books that I’ve read exclusively by the fireplace. They are both compilations of H.P. Lovecraft’s work and, whilst they do not contain all of his work, the beautiful illustrations and the care that has gone into this editions is still palpable (Unfortunately, I still found some typos).

Lovecraft’s gothic prose is far more effective if you are sitting next to a fire on a cold winter night. The horror and nightmarish landscapes of his stories soon became a bit more ominous and outside, where the sky is dark and the wind is howling, those terrors appear to be growing and lurking. If you are new to Lovecraft and you want to test if what I say is true, I suggest you get your hands on (or click on) any of the following: The Colour From Out of Space, The Music of Erich Zann, Dagon or The Tomb; and if you are thinking about purchasing one of these two books I suggest you go for the Necronomicon first (both are great, but his best stories are in there),  either way stay close to the fire. I assure you that it is the only thing that will keep you sane.

Random Trivia: and if you really want to OD on mood put on some Electric Wizard inspired by Lovecraft. WARNING: the following song is B-A-D-A-S-S.

The Collected Works of Edgar Allan Poe

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I own this beautiful Wordsworth Edition.

How could I not include Poe in this list? You can’t talk about horror in books without mentioning Edgar Allan Poe! He was the first one to shape the genre. Without him there is nothing: no Stephen King, no Lovecraft, no Neil Gaiman, no Alan Moore. Nothing.

Additionally, Edgar Allan Poe deserves special mention because he is a fantastic wordsmith -one of the bests in my humble opinion-. Almost everything he has written reads beautifully and, even if you don’t enjoy horror but love words, you might appreciate how he weaves each sentence with seamless perfection.

His stories are capable of creating a very real, palpable and confusing horror (The Pit and the Pendulum), a schizophrenic madness (The Tell-Tale Heart) or a doomed melancholic atmosphere (The Fall of the House of Usher), and if none of that is for you I still invite you to check out the brilliant adaptation that The Simpsons did of his most famous poem, The Raven.  It is narrated by James Earl Jones and has a huge fireplace! How can you possibly resist?

J.R.R Tolkien – The Lord of the Rings

9780261103252It is one of the few books that I’ve gone back to on several occasions and to be fair I do not need to have a fire to enjoy it, but the last time I read it I noticed that I was only feeling like delving into Middle-earth during the coldest months of the year, and the moment that there was no fire my desire to resume the quest to destroy the one ring vanished. It took me all the weekends of two winters and two autumns to finish it back in 2010 and 2011.(Editorial note: I’ve got to check the date when I finished reading it. I bet now that it must have been winter. Second editorial note:  It was the 29th of December of 2011. Well done me!)

I remember that during those two years I avoided the Peter Jackson movies because I wanted to detach the film’s visuals from the words of Tolkien and see if I could imagine Middle-earth just like I did when I was a kid. I’m happy to report that I was succesful in my attempt and that it was all thanks to the fireplace, the tea, the blanket and the book itself. All these elements managed to create the feeling that I was in my little hobbit hole where I could ponder and dream about these far away adventures.

So what is it about these four books and why are their stories enhanced by the companionship of a good fireplace? Well, as I mentioned throughout the post there is a question of mood and atmosphere, but the truth is that the particular fireplace that I’m talking about is located in a place that also helps me shut out the world and let my imagination soar. In this place the hearth becomes a vortex to another world where magic, fantasy, horrors and all that is unreal becomes a little bit more tangible; acting as a bridge between my imagination and my reality. The authors of these books are capable of conjuring entire worlds and their stories can transport you to amazing places, so it makes perfect sense that all the magic locked in those tales reacts well to the fire because, like Calvin said at the beginning, there is something magical about having a fire.

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A memento for you future-me. Those were really happy days, make sure you get more of them!

Last editorial note (I swear): the first drafts of this post were  a real bitch very complicated and frustrating to write. It took me quite a shitload few attempts to go from completely abstract thoughts on a preference that only made sense to me and that did not necessarily seem logical to a somewhat coherent post. I’m quite proud of it.

P.S: Beginning-of-the-post-me is so depressing. He needs to relax!

P.S.S: A P.S does not count as another editorial note. So suck it!

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